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SECOND SERIES.-No 11. 



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INFANT MINDS. 




NEW YORK: 

K I G G I N S Si KELLOGG, 
123 & 12^ William St. 



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INFANT MINDS. 




NEW YORK: 
KIGGINS & KELLOQO. 

88 JtJHN STREET. 







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SIMPLE POEMS, 



IrOR INFANT MINDS. 




THE SAIL-BOAT. 

Oh, see our little boat, 
How prettily it glides ; 

Like a bird it seems to float, 
Press'd forward by the tides, 

By the tides. 

The sky is shining brightly, 
The fishes dart below, 

While our little boat so lightly 
Leaps onward as we go — 

As we go 



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SIMPLE POEMS. 



T would like to be a boat, 
And live upon the sea ; 

So merrily I^d float, 

With naught to trouble me — 

Trouble me. 

But should a storm come near, 
And fill me with alarms, 

I would row to mother dear — 
My boat should be her arms, 

Mother^s arms. 




SIMPLE POEMS. 



A LITTLE STORY. 

I WILL write a little story, 

About a little boy; 
He is his father's comfort, 

He is his mother's joy. 

When we give a little errand, 
He thinks of what is said, 

Pulls down his little waistcoat. 
And holds up his little head. 

He holds his little fork 

By the handle as he should. 

And never spills his coffee, 
Nor drops about his food. 

His face is very pleasant, 
What he says is always true ; 

Now tell me, youngest reader^ 
If this little boy is you. 



6 SIMPLE POEMS. 



MY LITTLE DOLL ROSE. 

I HAVE a little doll, 

I take care of her clothes ; 
She has soft flaxen hair, 

And her name is Rose, 

She has pretty blue eyes, 
And a very small nose. 

And a cunning little mouth ; 
And her name is Rose. 

1 have a little sofa 

Where my doll may repose, 
Or sit up like a lady ; 

And her name is Rose. 

My doll can move her arms, 
And stand upon her toes. 

She can make a pretty courtesy, 
My dear little Rose. 



SIMPLE POEMS. 




MY BIRD IS GONE. 

*^My bird is gone/' 
Said Fanny Ray; 

*^My bird has flown, 
I can not play. 

*^ He sung so sweetly, 

Every day ; 
He sings no more, 

I can not play. 



8 SIMPLE POEMS. 

^' Go, put his cage 
Far, far away, 

I do not love, 
His cage to-day .'' 

She wiped her eyes, 
Poor Fanny Ray ; 

And sat and sighed, 
But could not play. 




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SIMPLE POEMS. 9 

THE BIRD^S ANSWER. 

^^I AM sorry, my dear, 
But I'd rather live here ; 
The skies they are fair, 
And I love the fresh air, 
The trees they are green, 
And I sit like a queen, 
On a branch as it goes, 
While the pleasant wind blows. 
I have more on my table 
To eat than I'm able, 
For the very large field 
My dessert does yield ; 
But come from your book, 
With a good humored look, 
When with care you have read 
And your lesson is said, 
Sit under the tree, 
With your sewing by me. 
And this afternoon, 
I will sing you a tune.'^ 



10 SIMPLE POEMS. 



THE KITE. 



Oh look at my kite, 
In its airy flight, 
How pretty it flies. 
Right up to the skies. 
With its white breast stirred, 
Just like a bird ! 

Pretty kite, pretty kite, 
In your airy flight 
What do you spy. 
In the bright blue sky ? 



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I wish I was you, ,) 

To be there too, 
Oh, then, how soon 
I would peep at the moon, 
And see the man there. 
Who gives me a stare, 
When I look up at night, 
At his beautiful light ! 



SIMPLE POEMS. 11 

OH I LOOK AT THE MOON. 

Oh, look at the moon ! 

She is shining up there, 
Oh, mother, she looks 

Like a lamp in the air. 

Last week she was smaller, 
And shaped like a bow, 

But now she's grown bigger, 
And round as an O. 

Pretty moon, pretty moon, 
How you shine on the door, 

And make it all bright 
On my nursery floor. 

You shine on my playthings, 
And show me their place. 

And I love to look up 

At your pretty bright face. 

And there is a star 

Close by you, and may be 
That small twinkling star 

Is your little baby. 



12 SIMPLE POEMS, 

THE SLEEPING BABY. 

Hush, liush, with your noise, 
What a talking you keep, 

You rude little boys, 
Now the baby^s asleep ! 

Hushaby, baby. 

Mamma has just told me 

To stay quite here, 
And, oh, she will scold me, 

If wakes, baby dear. 

Hushaby, baby. 

How soft its white arm. 
As it lies on its breast, 

Little baby no harm 
Shall come while you rest. 

Hushaby, hush. 

My task has been given. 

And I will be true, 
And sister and Heaven 

Will watch over you. 

Hushaby, baby. 



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SIMPLE POEMS. 13 



SCHOOL IS OUT. 

School is out, 
But do not shout ; 
School is done, 
But do not run. 

Put up your slate, 
Neat and straight ; 
Make your bow, 
If you know how. 

Take your '' spelling j 
To your dwelling, 
Your ^'reading^^ too. 
Keep clean and new. 

Then go home, 
And do not roam ; 
Your parents kiss, 
In quietness. 

Now run and play ; 
And so, ^' good day.'* 



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14 SIMPLE POEMS. 



TO AN ANT. 



Run here, little ant, 
For the pretty bird can't. 
I want you to come. 
And live at my home ; 
I know you will stay. 
And help me to play. 
Stop making that hill? 
Little ant, and be still; 
Come creep to my feet, 
Here is sugar to eat. 
Say are you not weary, 
My poor little deary, 
With bearing that load, 
Across the wide road ? 
Leave your hill now, to me, 
And then you shall see. 
That by filling my hand, 
1 can pile up the sand, 
And save you the pains. 
Of bringing these grains. 



SIMPLE POEMS. 16 

THE ANT'S ANSWER. 

Stop, stop, little miss, 
No such building as this, 
Will answer for me. 
As you plainly can see. 
I take very great pains, 
And place all the grains 
As if with a tool, 
By a carpenter's rule. 
You have thrown the sand 
All out of your hand. 
And so filled up my door, 
That I can't find it more. 
My king and my queen 
Are choked up within ; 
My Uttle ones too. 
Oh what shall I do ? 
You have smothered them all 
With the sand you let fall; 
I must borrow, or beg, 
Or look for an ecrcr 
To keep under my eye, 



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SIMPLE POEMS. 



For help by-and-by. 
A new house I must raise, 
In a very few days, 
Nor stand here and pine. 
Because youVe spoilt mine. 
For when winter days come, 
I shall mourn for my home ; 
So stand out of my way, 
I have no time to play. 




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123 & 125 William St. 
Also Manufacturers of every description of 

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a large Stock of which is constantly kept 
on hand. Their Assortment ot' 

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they would invite Country Merchants 

before purchasing elsewhere. 



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